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IRT help Wafaa at the Italian Hospital in Amman, Jordan

July 18, 2019

Flora Barker IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about the impact IRT are making in Amman, Jordan: Like millions of other refugees, 41-year-old Wafaa was forced to flee her home in Syria following the devastating civil war. She and her family made the treacherous journey to Jordan in 2013. With her husband Mohamed being trapped in […]

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Flora Barker

IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about the impact IRT are making in Amman, Jordan:

Like millions of other refugees, 41-year-old Wafaa was forced to flee her home in Syria following the devastating civil war. She and her family made the treacherous journey to Jordan in 2013. With her husband Mohamed being trapped in unemployment, due to his crippling physical disability, the family’s income is extremely limited. Wafaa and Mohamed survive month-to-month on food vouchers and cash assistance from The UN Refugee Agency. Even with some additional income from Wafaa’s brother, who works as a porter, the family members are still left stretched to their financial limit. Her brother only earns a meagre monthly wage of just 150 JOD (£162) and he uses it all to support his parents and other siblings as well.

Faced with these immensely challenging circumstances, Wafaa was diagnosed with anaemia. The family simply did not have the funds to pay for the lifesaving treatment which could end her suffering. As a refugee in Jordan, Wafaa is not entitled to government assistance; this is where The International Refugee Trust steps in. IRT sends regular funding to The Italian Hospital in Amman to ensure that financial support can be given to refugees who are in desperate need of urgent medical treatment, surgery and medicine. Wafaa was treated and able to successfully recover from anaemia, thanks to funding from IRT and the medical attention of The Dominican Sisters of The Presentation, who work tirelessly to run the hospital. With your generous donations, IRT will be able to save the lives of even more innocent refugees, just like Wafaa.
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IRT help baby Lilas in Jordan

July 18, 2019

Flora Barker IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about one of many Syrian refugee children IRT are helping: Lilas’ (pictured) parents Ahmad and Hailma had already suffered unimaginable pain as refugees from Aleppo, they fled to Jordan in 2013. Displaced by the brutal civil war which continues to destroy lives across Syria, they felt hopeless when […]

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Flora Barker

IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about one of many Syrian refugee children IRT are helping:
Lilas’ (pictured) parents Ahmad and Hailma had already suffered unimaginable pain as refugees from Aleppo, they fled to Jordan in 2013. Displaced by the brutal civil war which continues to destroy lives across Syria, they felt hopeless when they were faced with yet another undeserved trauma. Their 8-month-old daughter, Lilas, began suffering from bronchitis. Lilas is yet another statistic in the millions of innocent children whose parents have been forced to flee Syria in search of safety and basic human necessities like food and water. Just a baby, Lilas was in urgent need of crucial medical treatment, without which her bronchitis would have developed into life-ending pneumonia.

With father Ahmad doing the best he can working as a porter; the household income was still extremely limited. Ahmad and Hailma rely on financial support from The UN Refugee Agency just to cover the cost of keeping a roof over their family’s heads. Trapped in poverty, there was no money available for the family to pay for beloved daughter Lilas’ lifesaving medical care.

Thankfully, due to The International Refugee Trust’s financial support of The Italian Hospital in Amman, there remained hope for little baby Lilas. As non-Jordanian citizens, refugees are not entitled to government assistance towards medical treatment. A majority of refugee families simply do not have the funds to pay for medical treatment themselves. Therefore, the financial aid from IRT proves indispensable for many families just like Lilas’. With IRT’s help, Lilas was successfully treated for bronchitis and made a full recovery, ending her parents’ anguish. Without the ongoing hard work of The Dominican Sisters of The Presentation, who run The Italian Hospital, and your unbelievably generous donations as supporters of IRT, incredible success stories like these would not be possible.
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Hope for baby Jenny in Nzara, South Sudan

July 18, 2019

Jessica Eames In Nzara, South Sudan, IRT support the St Therese Hospital. The paediatric ward in particular is incredibly busy every day. Sarah Rubino who is a certified Midwife, has been working at the hospital for the past ten months and recently told us about little baby Jenny (pictured). THE ST THERESE HOSPITAL IS RUN […]

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Jessica Eames

In Nzara, South Sudan, IRT support the St Therese Hospital. The paediatric ward in particular is incredibly busy every day. Sarah Rubino who is a certified Midwife, has been working at the hospital for the past ten months and recently told us about little baby Jenny (pictured).

THE ST THERESE HOSPITAL IS RUN ON SOLAR POWER, THERE IS NO ELECTRICITY.
Sarah has seen first hand how access to supplies can mean life or death for many children. Life there is considered precious and sacred because of how quickly it can be lost. Even though not all these babies lives can be saved, with support from IRT, the incredible staff at the hospital are able to save many of these precious lives.

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Jenny (pictured) was born at 32 weeks gestation, and is an example of hope in Nzara. After her mother pushed twice, Jenny shot into the arms of Midwife Sarah, mid-afternoon on a nice warm day. She immediately began to cry but it was quickly evident that she needed more help breathing. After one hour of positive pressure ventilation, and 2 hours of oxygen before the solar power ran out, Jenny was able to start breastfeeding with only a little bit of fussing. Because she was born during a warm week, we were able to control her body temperature much better with our makeshift skin-to-skin incubator. Likely due to the warm weather, Jenny was able to be discharged at a week and a half old.

AFTER CAREFUL AND ATTENTIVE FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENTS, JENNY IS A PLUMP AND HEALTHY 5-MONTH-OLD.

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Twins Elizabeth and Nambatayo want to become Doctors and help other refugees

July 18, 2019

Jessica Eames Schools in refugee camps around the world are often underfunded and overcrowded, making it extremely difficult for refugee children to access a good education. Many families cannot afford to send their children to school, and with a lack of education, it is difficult for refugees to get out the poverty cycle, and improve […]

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Jessica Eames

Schools in refugee camps around the world are often underfunded and overcrowded, making it extremely difficult for refugee children to access a good education. Many families cannot afford to send their children to school, and with a lack of education, it is difficult for refugees to get out the poverty cycle, and improve their lives.

Twin sisters Elizabeth and Nambatayo, who were once in this predicament, are now at the Moyo Redeemer Children’s Home. They have big dreams of becoming doctors to help the people at their former refugee camp in Gulu. Thanks to your donations, Elizabeth and Nambatayo are now attending a government school where they can turn these dreams into a reality. We are so proud of Elizabeth and Nambatayo and hope to see them one day, working in hospitals, saving lives.

Read more about the Moyo Redeemer Children’s Home


Prosthetics for Refugees

July 18, 2019

(The StepOut Programme) The Challenge There are hundreds of thousands of refugees and young people living with amputations in the developing world. Unfortunately, the prosthetic limbs currently available are either too expensive or not fit for purpose. Our Aim IRT aims to support the development of high-activity, low-cost prosthetics which will help refugees and people […]

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(The StepOut Programme)

The Challenge
There are hundreds of thousands of refugees and young people living with amputations in the developing world. Unfortunately, the prosthetic limbs currently available are either too expensive or not fit for purpose.

Our Aim
IRT aims to support the development of high-activity, low-cost prosthetics which will help refugees and people in developing countries to regain their mobility and live with dignity.

IRT has partnered with an independent inventor to produce high-activity, low-cost prosthetics for people living in developing countries and refugee camps. While a Western-manufactured, carbon-fibre foot might cost in the region of $3,000 USD, the intention is to provide a lower limb prosthetic, with a mobile ankle, for under $100. The main objectives of this project are:

  • To run a pilot project providing prosthetics for a test group of 20 – 30 beneficiaries.
  • To set up production of the prosthetics, including delivery of a training package to cover the manufacturing process.
  • To then use the lessons learnt, to improve the product and service in order to rapidly expand the programme to places of greatest need.

The combinations of simplicity of design, availability of raw materials, ability to manufacture on site and the planned training package all combine to create truly sustainable change for the world’s poorest amputees, many of whom are refugees.


Nzara Primary School

July 18, 2019

The Challenge Every child deserves an education, but: IN SOUTH SUDAN 70% OF CHILDREN AGED 6-17 YEARS OLD WILL NEVER GET THE CHANCE TO GO TO SCHOOL, AND FOR THOSE CHILDREN WHO START SCHOOL ONLY 10% WILL COMPLETE PRIMARY SCHOOL. And the situation is even worse for girls where the attendance rate is only 33%. […]

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The Challenge
Every child deserves an education, but:

IN SOUTH SUDAN 70% OF CHILDREN AGED 6-17 YEARS OLD WILL NEVER GET THE CHANCE TO GO TO SCHOOL, AND FOR THOSE CHILDREN WHO START SCHOOL ONLY 10% WILL COMPLETE PRIMARY SCHOOL.
And the situation is even worse for girls where the attendance rate is only 33%. This all amounts to South Sudan having one of the worst education rates in the world.

Our Aim
International Refugee Trust (IRT) is trying to reverse these figures by supporting schools across South Sudan, providing financial support for crucial supplies like books and desks, supplementing teachers’ wages and even supporting maintenance costs, in particular ensuring clean water and latrines for the children.

Nzara Primary School
IRT has been supporting the Comboni Sisters’ primary school in Nzara for several years. We help by contributing to teachers’ salaries and providing school bags and high energy biscuits to the most malnourished children.

THE SCHOOL TEACHES AROUND 1,000 CHILDREN AND IS ONE OF THE BEST SCHOOLS IN THE REGION. IN 2012, THE SCHOOL WAS RANKED FIRST OUT OF ALL SCHOOLS IN THE WESTERN EQUATORIA STATE WITH TWO OF ITS STUDENTS RANKING AMONG THE BEST PERFORMING INDIVIDUALS.


Training Hall and Accommodation Block

July 18, 2019

In 2009, the IRT supported the construction of a training hall and small guest house at the Women’s Centre. It is now a crucial facility to the town proving a space for government agencies, charities and NGOs to work in and hold workshops and seminars for the local community. IT IS THE ONLY FACILITY OF […]

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In 2009, the IRT supported the construction of a training hall and small guest house at the Women’s Centre.

It is now a crucial facility to the town proving a space for government agencies, charities and NGOs to work in and hold workshops and seminars for the local community.

IT IS THE ONLY FACILITY OF ITS TYPE IN NZARA AND IS CREATING SUPPLEMENTARY INCOME TO SUPPORT THE RUNNING OF THE WOMEN’S CENTRE.


Rainbow HIV and Aids Project, Nzara Hospital

July 18, 2019

The Challenge There are an estimated 180,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in South Sudan. IN 2015, 12,000 PEOPLE DIED FROM AIDS, AND OVER 100,000 CHILDREN WERE ORPHANED AFTER LOSING ONE OR BOTH PARENTS TO THE DISEASE. Only 10% of those diagnosed with AIDS are receiving anti-retroviral treatment. There is already a lack of medical resources […]

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The Challenge
There are an estimated 180,000 people living with HIV/AIDS in South Sudan.

IN 2015, 12,000 PEOPLE DIED FROM AIDS, AND OVER 100,000 CHILDREN WERE ORPHANED AFTER LOSING ONE OR BOTH PARENTS TO THE DISEASE.
Only 10% of those diagnosed with AIDS are receiving anti-retroviral treatment. There is already a lack of medical resources to treat the disease, but rising tensions between government, rebels and different ethnic tribes have made travelling to clinics and hospitals even more difficult for patients.

Our Aim
IRT continues to support the Comboni Missionary Sisters and their volunteers to run programmes that alleviate the stress of living with HIV/AIDS through counselling and home visits.

Counselling and Advice
The Rainbow Volunteers provide home visits to those infected with HIV/AIDS and families affected by the disease. During their visits, they give counselling and advice on how to cope and live with the disease and how to minimise the spread of infection. They also frequently provide food because many of the families affected are so poor and the disease means they cannot work or grow food.

Caring for those with HIV/Aids
Living with the disease is difficult, and since many people cannot afford treatment, quality and length of life is lessened. Rainbow is an HIV/AIDS programme run by the Comboni Sisters using volunteers who provide home visits and counselling to affected people in and around Nzara. The programme sheds some light on an otherwise terrible situation.

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IN THE PAST YEAR, THE PROGRAMME HAS HELPED A TOTAL OF 700 ADULTS, 40 OF WHOM ARE BEDRIDDEN AND A TOTAL OF 320 CHILDREN, 105 OF WHOM ARE HIV POSITIVE.
They have also planted 5 banana plantations, 800 pineapple plants and a fish farm which are used to supply food for meals and any left over are sold to help generate extra income to support the programme.


Paediatric Ward at Nzara Hospital

July 18, 2019

The Challenge The hospital, located in the southwest of the country, is seeing an influx of patients due to increasing numbers of refugees and displaced people seeking out medical treatment. The Paediatric Ward, in particular, is treating increasing numbers of children with severe cases of malaria and sickle cell disease. IN A COUNTRY WITH ONE […]

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The Challenge


The hospital, located in the southwest of the country, is seeing an influx of patients due to increasing numbers of refugees and displaced people seeking out medical treatment. The Paediatric Ward, in particular, is treating increasing numbers of children with severe cases of malaria and sickle cell disease.
IN A COUNTRY WITH ONE OF THE WORLD’S HIGHEST CHILD MORTALITY RATES AT 93 DEATHS PER 1,000, THE PEDIATRIC WARD IS CRUCIAL TO REDUCING INFANT MORTALITY.

Our Aim

In supporting the operation of the Pediatric Ward, we aim to improve the health of children and provide lifesaving treatment to some of the most needy children.

Medical care for children


The pediatric ward of the Nzara Hospital was opened on the 9th September 2012, with a capacity of 66 beds and has since treated over 3,000 children. IRT helped equip the pediatric ward and continues to support its work paying for drugs, vital medical supplies and staff salaries.

The hospital treats children for common diseases including malaria, typhoid and other tropical infections. The staff also treat both chronic wounds and new injuries.

In the last year with IRT’s support, Nzara Hospital treated 5,456 children as inpatients, of which 3,600 children were below the age of 5 and treated for malaria, pneumonia and dehydration. We also helped to support the salaries of 2 certified nurses, 4 auxiliary nurses and 3 non-medical support staff.

Treatment for sickle cell disease


Genetically inherited, sickle cell disease is a blood disorder that causes several health problems such as anaemia, bacterial infections and stroke. The average life expectancy is significantly less than those who do not suffer from the disease. Those with the disease are more vulnerable to malaria, and in turn are more likely to succumb to malaria as well.

The Sisters began screening for, diagnosing and treating Sickle Cell Disease in late 2014. Thus far, 305 children have been screened, and the 38 children who have been newly diagnosed are in the care of the nurses for proper treatment.

The Sisters are also working on educating the staff about how this disease affects the children’s quality of life.

Identifying and Training Nurses


We are very proud of the achievement of the nursing programme in Nzara and we continue to support six secondary school graduates from the area to undertake nursing work experience at Nzara Hospital.

During their 12 months on the pediatric ward and in the laboratory, the students will shadow and support the nurses during their work. A series of basic training workshops in nursing are held every week by the Hospital’s nursing staff and doctors.

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Those students who show sufficient aptitude at the end of their one year will be offered training places at the Comboni Sisters nurse training centre in Wau, South Sudan or other training institutions.


Redeemer Children’s Home

July 18, 2019

The challenge Children at the Redeemer Children’s Home often arrive there through the most tragic circumstances, having lost their parents through conflict, extreme poverty and HIV/AIDS. THE CHILDREN NEED A SAFE AND LOVING ENVIRONMENT WHERE THEY CAN GROW UP AND ATTEND SCHOOL. Redeemer Children’s Home The Home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters, who […]

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The challenge
Children at the Redeemer Children’s Home often arrive there through the most tragic circumstances, having lost their parents through conflict, extreme poverty and HIV/AIDS.

THE CHILDREN NEED A SAFE AND LOVING ENVIRONMENT WHERE THEY CAN GROW UP AND ATTEND SCHOOL.
Redeemer Children’s Home
The Home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters, who provide a loving and caring home for the children while they attend school and later to go through vocational training. For example, training as car mechanics. Both girls and boys attend school and particular care is given to ensure they have good role models.

How IRT help
With our help, Redeemer Children’s Home has successfully established a small-scale farm with a piggery, dairy cattle and poultry. The farm also produces a number of crops including maize, soya and millet which are then ground by the Home’s mill. A large proportion of the crops are produced to feed the children. The Home also runs a small shop in the nearby town of Moyo. The shop sells items such as sugar, rice, eggs (from the Home’s chickens), toiletries, children’s shoes, clothes and fizzy drinks. All the profits from the shop go towards the Home’s day-to-day running costs.

In supporting Redeemer Children’s Home, we aim to provide orphaned children age 6 and up a safe and loving place in which to grow up and go to school.

To ensure the long-term care for the children, we work closely with the Sisters to establish income-generating projects.

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