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Redeemer Children’s Home

July 18, 2019

The challenge Children at the Redeemer Children’s Home often arrive there through the most tragic circumstances, having lost their parents through conflict, extreme poverty and HIV/AIDS. THE CHILDREN NEED A SAFE AND LOVING ENVIRONMENT WHERE THEY CAN GROW UP AND ATTEND SCHOOL. Redeemer Children’s Home The Home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters, who […]

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The challenge
Children at the Redeemer Children’s Home often arrive there through the most tragic circumstances, having lost their parents through conflict, extreme poverty and HIV/AIDS.

THE CHILDREN NEED A SAFE AND LOVING ENVIRONMENT WHERE THEY CAN GROW UP AND ATTEND SCHOOL.
Redeemer Children’s Home
The Home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters, who provide a loving and caring home for the children while they attend school and later to go through vocational training. For example, training as car mechanics. Both girls and boys attend school and particular care is given to ensure they have good role models.

How IRT help
With our help, Redeemer Children’s Home has successfully established a small-scale farm with a piggery, dairy cattle and poultry. The farm also produces a number of crops including maize, soya and millet which are then ground by the Home’s mill. A large proportion of the crops are produced to feed the children. The Home also runs a small shop in the nearby town of Moyo. The shop sells items such as sugar, rice, eggs (from the Home’s chickens), toiletries, children’s shoes, clothes and fizzy drinks. All the profits from the shop go towards the Home’s day-to-day running costs.

In supporting Redeemer Children’s Home, we aim to provide orphaned children age 6 and up a safe and loving place in which to grow up and go to school.

To ensure the long-term care for the children, we work closely with the Sisters to establish income-generating projects.

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Step Up

July 17, 2019

The challenge In northern Uganda, 80% of the population are subsistence farmers meaning they survive hand-to-mouth, growing just enough food for one meal a day. Farming is heavy work, yet over 75% of the labour is done by women who work 12-18 hour days. CHILD MORTALITY IN THE REGION IS AROUND 50%. People see no […]

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The challenge
In northern Uganda, 80% of the population are subsistence farmers meaning they survive hand-to-mouth, growing just enough food for one meal a day. Farming is heavy work, yet over 75% of the labour is done by women who work 12-18 hour days.

CHILD MORTALITY IN THE REGION IS AROUND 50%.
People see no other way to survive. They are trapped in a cycle of poverty-aid-dependence with seemingly no way to break out of this cycle and become self-sufficient.

How IRT help
StepUp tackles the key reasons people are trapped in poverty. Through an intensive training programme, StepUp teaches people:

  • How to grow their own food more effectively, and sell the excess to pay for other needs.
  • How to maintain a clean and safe home, preventing the spread of disease.
  • How to start a business and save for the future.
  • How to work together as a community, with strong women leaders.

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It’s simple, but these are the crucial skills that allow people to take the first steps from poverty towards prosperity. These skills give people the understanding, belief and self-esteem to change their own circumstances, and keep it that way.

AS OF JANUARY 2019, 15,990 PEOPLE ARE PARTICIPATING IN OUR STEPUP PROGRAMME
Sustainable farming
When you’re just trying to survive day-to-day, you can’t think beyond finding your next meal. So the first step is to ensure people have a reliable source of food. StepUp teaches families how to grow and tend a kitchen garden which provides them with a regular source of nutritious food. They can also sell the excess food and thus earn a small income.

WITH FOOD SECURITY AND A SMALL INCOME, THE FAMILIES CAN NOW START TO WORK ON IMPROVING THEIR LIVING CONDITIONS.
Sanitation and Health
The second step is to learn how to maintain a clean and safe home, helping to prevent the spread of disease. Saving enough money to build a pit latrine (toilet) is a key part of this step. Once they have enough, families will need to learn how to build a pit latrine as well as where to dig rubbish pits and build drying racks for dishes. Families subsequently gain knowledge of the importance of maternal health and the risks of HIV/Aids.

WITH THE FAMILIES LEARNING, FOR THE FIRST TIME, HOW TO SAVE MONEY AND TO BUDGET, THEY CAN NOW START TO THINK LONG-TERM AND DREAM BIG
Finance Skills and Small Businesses
StepUp works with the families to set up savings and credit groups. Through these groups the families learn to manage their savings and can access small loans to help them start new businesses such as trading cooking oil and fish or selling crops on a commercial basis. With the ability to make money and save for the future, the families are once and for all able to provide for themselves now and in the future.

THEY ARE NO LONGER DEPENDENT ON OTHERS.
Community Leadership for the Future
Underlying the success of StepUp is an emphasis on working together as a community and promoting women as leaders. With a support network and strong community leaders, the families can continue to capitalise on StepUp long after they complete their last training session.

Education is crucial to a person and a community’s future success, that is why StepUp works with parents to ensure both their sons and daughters attend school and support those parents whom themselves need help with adult literacy.

STEPUP ALSO PROVIDES SCHOLARSHIPS TO THE BEST PERFORMING CHILDREN SO THEY MAY CONTINUE WITH THEIR HIGHER EDUCATION.
Five-a-week Campaign
We are often told by nutritionists that to lead a healthy life, you simply must eat five pieces of fruit and veg, and 3 meals a day.
However, many parents of children in northern Uganda, victims of extreme poverty, will have to survive on only five meals a week, washed down with dirty water.
If you feel that these children and their families do not deserve to live in this poverty, donate today and feed these children the three meals a day they deserve.

GIVE THEM A CHANCE AT SURVIVAL.


Moyo Babies Home

July 17, 2019

The challenge Many children and babies become orphaned during times of conflict and forced displacement. The nature of the conflicts in northern Uganda and across the border in South Sudan has made it especially difficult to find relatives of lost and orphaned children. Every child deserves a safe and loving environment to grow up in […]

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The challenge
Many children and babies become orphaned during times of conflict and forced displacement. The nature of the conflicts in northern Uganda and across the border in South Sudan has made it especially difficult to find relatives of lost and orphaned children.

Every child deserves a safe and loving environment to grow up in and that is exactly what Moyo Babies’ Home offers to hundreds of babies and children.

Moyo Babies’ Home
The home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters who provide the children with a safe and loving environment to grow up in and to begin school. The babies are watched over constantly by the Care Assistants, who give loving care to all the children. When the children become old enough, the Home supports them in going to the local nursery school and then to the primary school nearby.

Re-homing the children
The Head of Moyo Babies’ Home Sr. Maureen Kojoa does all that she can to find the children permanant homes either in the local community or, if they are South Sudanese, back in South Sudan. Fortunately, each year a few lucky children are found loving homes in their former communities.

Sr. Maureen makes rigorous checks on the suitability of prospective adoptive families and conducts follow-up visits after the child has been re-settled.

How IRT help
To help ensure the long-term care of the children, IRT is supporting the Sisters at Moyo Babies’Home to establish and run income-generating projects which can help fund the day-to-day running of the Home. Projects include vegetable growing, keeping poultry and rearing goats. These type of projects not only help supply the Home with food for the older children but the excess can be sold to pay for the babies’ formula.

The Sisters also share beehives with the Sisters at Redeemer Children’s Home. Beekeeping is a great source of income as honey is an in-demand product in Uganda.

In supporting Moyo Babies’ Home, our aim is to provide vulnerable orphaned babies and children in northern Uganda with a safe and loving environment to grow up.


Scholarships for Girls

July 17, 2019

The challenge While the rate of primary and secondary education is climbing in Uganda, there are still many factors turning girls away from school. Inadequate school infrastructure (classrooms and furniture), sexual harassment and gender based violence, pregnancy, and household responsibilities such as cooking and caring for younger siblings are all major deterrents for girls in […]

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The challenge
While the rate of primary and secondary education is climbing in Uganda, there are still many factors turning girls away from school. Inadequate school infrastructure (classrooms and furniture), sexual harassment and gender based violence, pregnancy, and household responsibilities such as cooking and caring for younger siblings are all major deterrents for girls in Uganda. In rural areas, it is even more difficult for girls to attend school because of the school fees and finding money for transportation to the school.

While there are many forces working against the female child, the benefits of receiving an education outweigh the negative aspects tremendously.

How IRT help
As part of the StepUp programme, OCA has established a scholarship scheme that promotes and encourages education for the girl child. Girls in StepUp communities have the ability to join a programme that provides funding for their school fees. While not every girl is able to be a part of the programme, it has definitely encouraged more girls to attend school.

IN ONE STEPUP COMMUNITY, OVER 50 GIRLS ARE NOW ENROLLED IN SECONDARY SCHOOL.