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IRT help Wafaa at the Italian Hospital in Amman, Jordan

July 18, 2019

Flora Barker IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about the impact IRT are making in Amman, Jordan: Like millions of other refugees, 41-year-old Wafaa was forced to flee her home in Syria following the devastating civil war. She and her family made the treacherous journey to Jordan in 2013. With her husband Mohamed being trapped in […]

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Flora Barker

IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about the impact IRT are making in Amman, Jordan:

Like millions of other refugees, 41-year-old Wafaa was forced to flee her home in Syria following the devastating civil war. She and her family made the treacherous journey to Jordan in 2013. With her husband Mohamed being trapped in unemployment, due to his crippling physical disability, the family’s income is extremely limited. Wafaa and Mohamed survive month-to-month on food vouchers and cash assistance from The UN Refugee Agency. Even with some additional income from Wafaa’s brother, who works as a porter, the family members are still left stretched to their financial limit. Her brother only earns a meagre monthly wage of just 150 JOD (£162) and he uses it all to support his parents and other siblings as well.

Faced with these immensely challenging circumstances, Wafaa was diagnosed with anaemia. The family simply did not have the funds to pay for the lifesaving treatment which could end her suffering. As a refugee in Jordan, Wafaa is not entitled to government assistance; this is where The International Refugee Trust steps in. IRT sends regular funding to The Italian Hospital in Amman to ensure that financial support can be given to refugees who are in desperate need of urgent medical treatment, surgery and medicine. Wafaa was treated and able to successfully recover from anaemia, thanks to funding from IRT and the medical attention of The Dominican Sisters of The Presentation, who work tirelessly to run the hospital. With your generous donations, IRT will be able to save the lives of even more innocent refugees, just like Wafaa.


IRT help baby Lilas in Jordan

July 18, 2019

Flora Barker IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about one of many Syrian refugee children IRT are helping: Lilas’ (pictured) parents Ahmad and Hailma had already suffered unimaginable pain as refugees from Aleppo, they fled to Jordan in 2013. Displaced by the brutal civil war which continues to destroy lives across Syria, they felt hopeless when […]

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Flora Barker

IRT volunteer Flora Barker writes about one of many Syrian refugee children IRT are helping:
Lilas’ (pictured) parents Ahmad and Hailma had already suffered unimaginable pain as refugees from Aleppo, they fled to Jordan in 2013. Displaced by the brutal civil war which continues to destroy lives across Syria, they felt hopeless when they were faced with yet another undeserved trauma. Their 8-month-old daughter, Lilas, began suffering from bronchitis. Lilas is yet another statistic in the millions of innocent children whose parents have been forced to flee Syria in search of safety and basic human necessities like food and water. Just a baby, Lilas was in urgent need of crucial medical treatment, without which her bronchitis would have developed into life-ending pneumonia.

With father Ahmad doing the best he can working as a porter; the household income was still extremely limited. Ahmad and Hailma rely on financial support from The UN Refugee Agency just to cover the cost of keeping a roof over their family’s heads. Trapped in poverty, there was no money available for the family to pay for beloved daughter Lilas’ lifesaving medical care.

Thankfully, due to The International Refugee Trust’s financial support of The Italian Hospital in Amman, there remained hope for little baby Lilas. As non-Jordanian citizens, refugees are not entitled to government assistance towards medical treatment. A majority of refugee families simply do not have the funds to pay for medical treatment themselves. Therefore, the financial aid from IRT proves indispensable for many families just like Lilas’. With IRT’s help, Lilas was successfully treated for bronchitis and made a full recovery, ending her parents’ anguish. Without the ongoing hard work of The Dominican Sisters of The Presentation, who run The Italian Hospital, and your unbelievably generous donations as supporters of IRT, incredible success stories like these would not be possible.


Hope for baby Jenny in Nzara, South Sudan

July 18, 2019

Jessica Eames In Nzara, South Sudan, IRT support the St Therese Hospital. The paediatric ward in particular is incredibly busy every day. Sarah Rubino who is a certified Midwife, has been working at the hospital for the past ten months and recently told us about little baby Jenny (pictured). THE ST THERESE HOSPITAL IS RUN […]

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Jessica Eames

In Nzara, South Sudan, IRT support the St Therese Hospital. The paediatric ward in particular is incredibly busy every day. Sarah Rubino who is a certified Midwife, has been working at the hospital for the past ten months and recently told us about little baby Jenny (pictured).

THE ST THERESE HOSPITAL IS RUN ON SOLAR POWER, THERE IS NO ELECTRICITY.
Sarah has seen first hand how access to supplies can mean life or death for many children. Life there is considered precious and sacred because of how quickly it can be lost. Even though not all these babies lives can be saved, with support from IRT, the incredible staff at the hospital are able to save many of these precious lives.

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Jenny (pictured) was born at 32 weeks gestation, and is an example of hope in Nzara. After her mother pushed twice, Jenny shot into the arms of Midwife Sarah, mid-afternoon on a nice warm day. She immediately began to cry but it was quickly evident that she needed more help breathing. After one hour of positive pressure ventilation, and 2 hours of oxygen before the solar power ran out, Jenny was able to start breastfeeding with only a little bit of fussing. Because she was born during a warm week, we were able to control her body temperature much better with our makeshift skin-to-skin incubator. Likely due to the warm weather, Jenny was able to be discharged at a week and a half old.

AFTER CAREFUL AND ATTENTIVE FOLLOW-UP APPOINTMENTS, JENNY IS A PLUMP AND HEALTHY 5-MONTH-OLD.

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Twins Elizabeth and Nambatayo want to become Doctors and help other refugees

July 18, 2019

Jessica Eames Schools in refugee camps around the world are often underfunded and overcrowded, making it extremely difficult for refugee children to access a good education. Many families cannot afford to send their children to school, and with a lack of education, it is difficult for refugees to get out the poverty cycle, and improve […]

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Jessica Eames

Schools in refugee camps around the world are often underfunded and overcrowded, making it extremely difficult for refugee children to access a good education. Many families cannot afford to send their children to school, and with a lack of education, it is difficult for refugees to get out the poverty cycle, and improve their lives.

Twin sisters Elizabeth and Nambatayo, who were once in this predicament, are now at the Moyo Redeemer Children’s Home. They have big dreams of becoming doctors to help the people at their former refugee camp in Gulu. Thanks to your donations, Elizabeth and Nambatayo are now attending a government school where they can turn these dreams into a reality. We are so proud of Elizabeth and Nambatayo and hope to see them one day, working in hospitals, saving lives.

Read more about the Moyo Redeemer Children’s Home