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Step Up

July 17, 2019

The challenge In northern Uganda, 80% of the population are subsistence farmers meaning they survive hand-to-mouth, growing just enough food for one meal a day. Farming is heavy work, yet over 75% of the labour is done by women who work 12-18 hour days. CHILD MORTALITY IN THE REGION IS AROUND 50%. People see no […]

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The challenge
In northern Uganda, 80% of the population are subsistence farmers meaning they survive hand-to-mouth, growing just enough food for one meal a day. Farming is heavy work, yet over 75% of the labour is done by women who work 12-18 hour days.

CHILD MORTALITY IN THE REGION IS AROUND 50%.
People see no other way to survive. They are trapped in a cycle of poverty-aid-dependence with seemingly no way to break out of this cycle and become self-sufficient.

How IRT help
StepUp tackles the key reasons people are trapped in poverty. Through an intensive training programme, StepUp teaches people:

  • How to grow their own food more effectively, and sell the excess to pay for other needs.
  • How to maintain a clean and safe home, preventing the spread of disease.
  • How to start a business and save for the future.
  • How to work together as a community, with strong women leaders.

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It’s simple, but these are the crucial skills that allow people to take the first steps from poverty towards prosperity. These skills give people the understanding, belief and self-esteem to change their own circumstances, and keep it that way.

AS OF JANUARY 2019, 15,990 PEOPLE ARE PARTICIPATING IN OUR STEPUP PROGRAMME
Sustainable farming
When you’re just trying to survive day-to-day, you can’t think beyond finding your next meal. So the first step is to ensure people have a reliable source of food. StepUp teaches families how to grow and tend a kitchen garden which provides them with a regular source of nutritious food. They can also sell the excess food and thus earn a small income.

WITH FOOD SECURITY AND A SMALL INCOME, THE FAMILIES CAN NOW START TO WORK ON IMPROVING THEIR LIVING CONDITIONS.
Sanitation and Health
The second step is to learn how to maintain a clean and safe home, helping to prevent the spread of disease. Saving enough money to build a pit latrine (toilet) is a key part of this step. Once they have enough, families will need to learn how to build a pit latrine as well as where to dig rubbish pits and build drying racks for dishes. Families subsequently gain knowledge of the importance of maternal health and the risks of HIV/Aids.

WITH THE FAMILIES LEARNING, FOR THE FIRST TIME, HOW TO SAVE MONEY AND TO BUDGET, THEY CAN NOW START TO THINK LONG-TERM AND DREAM BIG
Finance Skills and Small Businesses
StepUp works with the families to set up savings and credit groups. Through these groups the families learn to manage their savings and can access small loans to help them start new businesses such as trading cooking oil and fish or selling crops on a commercial basis. With the ability to make money and save for the future, the families are once and for all able to provide for themselves now and in the future.

THEY ARE NO LONGER DEPENDENT ON OTHERS.
Community Leadership for the Future
Underlying the success of StepUp is an emphasis on working together as a community and promoting women as leaders. With a support network and strong community leaders, the families can continue to capitalise on StepUp long after they complete their last training session.

Education is crucial to a person and a community’s future success, that is why StepUp works with parents to ensure both their sons and daughters attend school and support those parents whom themselves need help with adult literacy.

STEPUP ALSO PROVIDES SCHOLARSHIPS TO THE BEST PERFORMING CHILDREN SO THEY MAY CONTINUE WITH THEIR HIGHER EDUCATION.
Five-a-week Campaign
We are often told by nutritionists that to lead a healthy life, you simply must eat five pieces of fruit and veg, and 3 meals a day.
However, many parents of children in northern Uganda, victims of extreme poverty, will have to survive on only five meals a week, washed down with dirty water.
If you feel that these children and their families do not deserve to live in this poverty, donate today and feed these children the three meals a day they deserve.

GIVE THEM A CHANCE AT SURVIVAL.


Moyo Babies Home

July 17, 2019

The challenge Many children and babies become orphaned during times of conflict and forced displacement. The nature of the conflicts in northern Uganda and across the border in South Sudan has made it especially difficult to find relatives of lost and orphaned children. Every child deserves a safe and loving environment to grow up in […]

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The challenge
Many children and babies become orphaned during times of conflict and forced displacement. The nature of the conflicts in northern Uganda and across the border in South Sudan has made it especially difficult to find relatives of lost and orphaned children.

Every child deserves a safe and loving environment to grow up in and that is exactly what Moyo Babies’ Home offers to hundreds of babies and children.

Moyo Babies’ Home
The home is run by the Sacred Heart Sisters who provide the children with a safe and loving environment to grow up in and to begin school. The babies are watched over constantly by the Care Assistants, who give loving care to all the children. When the children become old enough, the Home supports them in going to the local nursery school and then to the primary school nearby.

Re-homing the children
The Head of Moyo Babies’ Home Sr. Maureen Kojoa does all that she can to find the children permanant homes either in the local community or, if they are South Sudanese, back in South Sudan. Fortunately, each year a few lucky children are found loving homes in their former communities.

Sr. Maureen makes rigorous checks on the suitability of prospective adoptive families and conducts follow-up visits after the child has been re-settled.

How IRT help
To help ensure the long-term care of the children, IRT is supporting the Sisters at Moyo Babies’Home to establish and run income-generating projects which can help fund the day-to-day running of the Home. Projects include vegetable growing, keeping poultry and rearing goats. These type of projects not only help supply the Home with food for the older children but the excess can be sold to pay for the babies’ formula.

The Sisters also share beehives with the Sisters at Redeemer Children’s Home. Beekeeping is a great source of income as honey is an in-demand product in Uganda.

In supporting Moyo Babies’ Home, our aim is to provide vulnerable orphaned babies and children in northern Uganda with a safe and loving environment to grow up.


Scholarships for Girls

July 17, 2019

The challenge While the rate of primary and secondary education is climbing in Uganda, there are still many factors turning girls away from school. Inadequate school infrastructure (classrooms and furniture), sexual harassment and gender based violence, pregnancy, and household responsibilities such as cooking and caring for younger siblings are all major deterrents for girls in […]

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The challenge
While the rate of primary and secondary education is climbing in Uganda, there are still many factors turning girls away from school. Inadequate school infrastructure (classrooms and furniture), sexual harassment and gender based violence, pregnancy, and household responsibilities such as cooking and caring for younger siblings are all major deterrents for girls in Uganda. In rural areas, it is even more difficult for girls to attend school because of the school fees and finding money for transportation to the school.

While there are many forces working against the female child, the benefits of receiving an education outweigh the negative aspects tremendously.

How IRT help
As part of the StepUp programme, OCA has established a scholarship scheme that promotes and encourages education for the girl child. Girls in StepUp communities have the ability to join a programme that provides funding for their school fees. While not every girl is able to be a part of the programme, it has definitely encouraged more girls to attend school.

IN ONE STEPUP COMMUNITY, OVER 50 GIRLS ARE NOW ENROLLED IN SECONDARY SCHOOL.


Karak Hospital

July 17, 2019

The challenge Karak is in the South of Jordan and has been described as ‘the forgotten corner of the Syrian Crisis’ with more than 20,000 refugees residing in the region. Syrian refugees who have found shelter in Karak, Tefile, Qatrane and other small villages are arriving at the hospital seeking emergency medical treatment. Unfortunately, these […]

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The challenge
Karak is in the South of Jordan and has been described as ‘the forgotten corner of the Syrian Crisis’ with more than 20,000 refugees residing in the region. Syrian refugees who have found shelter in Karak, Tefile, Qatrane and other small villages are arriving at the hospital seeking emergency medical treatment.

Unfortunately, these areas are not the focus of humanitarian aid in Jordan; the local governments are stretched too thin and cannot help the refugees.

Our aim
We aim to help the most needy and support the hospitals’ doctors and nurses to care for as many vulnerable refugees as possible, to provide crucial treatments, lifesaving surgeries and any additional methods of support they may need.

Medical care for Syrian refugees
The hospital is run by our partners The Comboni Missionary Sisters who provide essential and lifesaving medical treatment for Syrian refugees. It is the only hospital in the region with the necessary equipment and experienced staff required to perform the treatments needed; treatments such as dialysis for the increasing number of children suffering from kidney problems or emergency surgeries.

Many of the Syrian refugees requiring emergency surgery are young mothers who urgently need a caesarean section in order to safely delivery their babies.

Without the care of the hospital’s surgeons and the excellent care of Sr.Clara, who oversees the postnatal ward, both mother and baby could very likely die in childbirth. With IRT’s support, the hospital is able to treat mothers and babies who desperately need their help.

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The hospital also sees many Syrian refugees who are sick and require antibiotics to treat infection and fever. The unsanitary living conditions many of the refugees are forced to live in mean they are highly susceptible to infections, especially young children. The Sisters and staff at the hospital ensure these children receive the necessary treatments and medication to recover from their infections.

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Italian Hospital, Amman

July 17, 2019

The Challenge Many of the Syrian refugees arrive in Jordan sick and injured, or they become sick and succumb to infections because of the overcrowded living conditions. The high levels of stress also cause complications and premature births in many of the women. WE ARE HAVING NOW AT LEAST 300 OR MORE, OUTPATIENTS AND MANY […]

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The Challenge
Many of the Syrian refugees arrive in Jordan sick and injured, or they become sick and succumb to infections because of the overcrowded living conditions. The high levels of stress also cause complications and premature births in many of the women.

WE ARE HAVING NOW AT LEAST 300 OR MORE, OUTPATIENTS AND MANY INPATIENTS EACH DAY. MANY MANY OPERATIONS, ENDLESS DELIVERIES, CAESAREAN SECTION (AT LEAST 5-6 PER DAY). DUE TO STRESS, THERE ARE MANY PREMATURE DELIVERIES AND COMPLICATIONS FOR THE MOTHERS.” – SR. ELIZABETH CHAKKIATH, DIRECTOR OF THE ITALIAN HOSPITAL, AMMAN

Our Aim
We aim to help the most needy and to support the hospitals’ doctors and nurses to care for as many vulnerable refugees as possible, to provide crucial treatments, lifesaving surgeries and any additional methods of support they may need.

Medical care for Syrian refugees
The hospital is run by our partners The Dominican Sisters Of The Presentation and treats as many people as possible in its outpatient department, but some have to be admitted, increasing costs. Medical care includes treating scabies (very common due to the overcrowded, unhygienic conditions the refugees are forced to live in).

MANY OF THE CHILDREN ALSO DEVELOP SERIOUS INFECTIONS BECAUSE THEY ARE SO WEAK AND MALNOURISHED.

More serious illnesses such as kidney stones, nephrostomy, gastroscopy and bone infections require surgery. Because of the conditions and stress of fleeing the bombing in Syria many women suffer complicated pregnancies and require caesarean sections.
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